Melbourne victims lose thousands in ATM credit card skimming scam


Melbourne victims have lost thousands of dollars in a credit card scam, but they still don’t know where or how they were compromised.

On Tuesday, Victoria Police released photos of a man they want to speak to after people had nearly $9,000 in cash stolen from skimmed credit cards.

The man visited 12 ATMs across Melbourne and used details of cards that had been previously skimmed to withdraw other people’s money.

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The victims’ credit cards were allegedly compromised between December and March.

But victims still don’t know how or when it happened.

On Tuesday, Victoria Police released photos of a man they want to speak to after people had nearly $9,000 in cash stolen from skimmed credit cards. Credit: Victoria Police

The money was withdrawn from ATMs in Toorak, South Yarra, Box Hill, Richmond, Springvale, Fairfield and in Melbourne’s CBD.

The man the police want to talk to about the incident was described as Caucasian in appearance, in his thirties and of strong build.

Usually, when caught on CCTV, he is seen wearing a black New York Yankees baseball cap, a blue surgical mask, a black hoodie with white writing on his check, and adidas joggers.

Police are urging all other victims to come forward and anyone with information to contact them.

The former 7NEWS journalist falls into the scam.

The former 7NEWS journalist falls into the scam.

How does credit card skimming work?

Credit card skimming occurs when a scammer uses a hidden device during an ATM or EFTPOS transaction to capture cardholder details. In particular, it targets the magnetic stripe on the back of the card.

These details are then used to steal money from the skimmed card through another ATM.

According to Commonwealth Bank, the devices used to capture details are typically smaller than a deck of cards and can be hidden near the ATM’s card reader.

Melbourne victims have lost thousands of dollars in a credit card scam, but they still don’t know where or how they were compromised. File picture. Credit: d3sign/File Image: Getty

If you use an ATM, check the machine for any suspicious tampering, especially at the card entry slot.

A skimmer device is shaped differently from the normal card reader and often covers the flashing light at the point of entry or the rain cover of the ATM.

These devices are often attached to machines during quiet times, such as early morning or late evening, and usually in place for less than 24 hours.

Cardholders should also keep an eye out for PIN capture cameras that can be as small as a pinhole.

CommBank states that successful card skimming requires both the reader’s skimmed card and the PIN capture device.

ATM users should always check for anything unusual, such as the card reader above the screen, and report it to the police.

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